10 Best Cushioned Long Distance Running Shoes

Updated on: July 2021

Best Cushioned Long Distance Running Shoes in 2021


Brooks Womens Launch 6 Running Shoe - Black/Primer/Bel Air Blue - B - 7.5

Brooks Womens Launch 6 Running Shoe - Black/Primer/Bel Air Blue - B - 7.5
BESTSELLER NO. 1 in 2021
  • SHOE SIZE: "B" = Medium width
  • THIS SHOE IS FOR: This is a great option for neutral, efficient runners who don’t like a super soft shoe. It has just-right spring and is light enough to be a race shoe for longer distances like the marathon.
  • ENERGIZED FEEL: Delivers a responsive and springy ride to add extra lift to your stride without compromising support or speed.
  • SPRINGY CUSHIONING: BioMoGo DNA midsole cushioning and rebounding rubber create a springy feel underfoot.
  • LIGHTWEIGHT FIT: The one-piece mesh upper and internal bootie are so light and breezy, they feel like they’re not even there.

ASICS Men's Gel-Nimbus 21 Running Shoes, 11.5M, White/DEEP Sapphire

ASICS Men's Gel-Nimbus 21 Running Shoes, 11.5M, White/DEEP Sapphire
BESTSELLER NO. 2 in 2021
  • FlyteFoam Propel Technology - ASICS energetic foam formulation that provides supreme bounce thanks to a unique elastomer compound.
  • AHAR Outsole - Acronym for ASICS High Abrasion Rubber. Placed in critical areas of the outsole for exceptional durability.
  • Reflectivity - Contains reflective materials designed to enhance visibility during low light hours.
  • Heel Clutching System Technology - Exoskeletal heel counter provides improved support and creates improved heel fitting environment.
  • FlyteFoam Lyte Technology - ASICS lightest weight midsole formulation that provides continuous cushion thanks to organic nano fibers.

Brooks Womens Ghost 12 Running Shoe - Peacoat/Blue/Aqua - B - 8.5…

Brooks Womens Ghost 12 Running Shoe - Peacoat/Blue/Aqua - B - 8.5…
BESTSELLER NO. 3 in 2021
  • THIS SHOE IS FOR: Neutral runners looking for a lightweight shoe and a smooth ride without sacrificing cushioning. Whether you’re a Ghost loyalist or are lacing one up for the first time, you’ll find plenty to like.
  • SUPPORT AND CUSHION: The neutral support type provides high energizing cushioning. Ideal for road running, cross training, the gym or wherever you might want to take them! Predecessor: Ghost 11
  • BALANCED, SOFT CUSHIONING: BioMoGo DNA and DNA LOFT cushioning work together to provide a just-right softness underfoot without losing responsiveness and durability - yet it feels lighter than ever.
  • SMOOTH, STABLE RIDE: No matter how your foot lands, our Segmented Crash Pad - an integrated system of shock absorbers - will cushion every step and stride for smooth heel-to-toe transitions.
  • SOFT, SECURE, FIT: The newly engineered mesh and 3D Fit Print practically disappears on your foot with strategically placed stretch and structure.

WHITIN Womens Running Shoes Runny Tennis Athletic Breathable Comfort Cushioned Supportive Cute Flexible Mesh Classic Size 6.5 Long Distance Run Trail Runner Crossfit Sneakers for Female Light Blue

WHITIN Womens Running Shoes Runny Tennis Athletic Breathable Comfort Cushioned Supportive Cute Flexible Mesh Classic Size 6.5 Long Distance Run Trail Runner Crossfit Sneakers for Female Light Blue
BESTSELLER NO. 4 in 2021
  • High-rebound EVA midsole for added support and shock absorption.
  • Durable rubber outsole with grooves for excellent flexibility and traction.
  • Lace and Tongue System accommodates the motions of the runner for added comfort.
  • Level platform design features a lower heel-to-toe drop for a more natural running position.
  • Open-weave mesh upper with no-sew overlays provides optimal foot conformity and breathability.

Saucony Women's Triumph ISO 2 Running Shoe, Grey/Blue/Slime, 11 M US

Saucony Women's Triumph ISO 2 Running Shoe, Grey/Blue/Slime, 11 M US
BESTSELLER NO. 5 in 2021
  • Neutral running shoe with highly-breathable mesh upper featuring lightweight synthetic overlays and ultrasoft ISOFIT inner-sleeve liner
  • EVERUN top sole
  • PWRGRID+ midsole
  • SRC Landing Zone
  • TRI-FLEX outsole

adidas Women's Energyfalcon X Running Shoe, Black/White/Grey, 8.5 M US

adidas Women's Energyfalcon X Running Shoe, Black/White/Grey, 8.5 M US
BESTSELLER NO. 6 in 2021
  • Regular fit
  • Lace closure
  • Mesh upper with TPU cage and heel counter
  • Durable Adiwear outsole, Textile lining

Under Armour Men's Micro G Pursuit Running Shoe, Anthracite (102)/Black, 8.5

Under Armour Men's Micro G Pursuit Running Shoe, Anthracite (102)/Black, 8.5
BESTSELLER NO. 7 in 2021
  • NEUTRAL: For runners who need a balance of flexibility & cushioning
  • Lightweight mesh upper delivers complete breathability
  • Foam padding placed around your ankle collar & under the tongue for an incredibly comfortable fit & feel
  • High rebound, die cut EVA sockliner built with extended arch support
  • One piece Micro G foam midsole turns cushioned landings into explosive takeoffs

Brooks Mens Adrenaline GTS 19 Running Shoe - Grey/Blue/Ebony - B - 10.0

Brooks Mens Adrenaline GTS 19 Running Shoe - Grey/Blue/Ebony - B - 10.0
BESTSELLER NO. 8 in 2021
  • SHOE SIZE: "D" = Medium width, "EE" = Wide width, "B" = Narrow width, "EEEE" = Extra wide width
  • FOOT SUPPORT: Ideal for runners with all arches looking for support. Our new Guiderail Support System focuses beyond the feet to the most injury-prone part of a runner’s body: the knees. GuideRails keep you moving comfortably by keeping excess movement in check.
  • CUSHIONED FEEL: Soft and protective, these shoes provide just the right amount of cushion in each step to let you float through your run, walk and everyday life.
  • BALANCED, SOFT CUSHIONING: BioMoGo DNA and DNA LOFT cushioning work together to provide a just-right softness underfoot without losing responsiveness and durability—yet it feels lighter than ever.
  • MODERNIZED FIT: Engineered mesh and the 3D Fit Print upper provide the structure and proven fit of this Go-To Shoe with a streamlined look.

Under Armour Men's Surge 2 Running Shoe, Black (001)/White, 12

Under Armour Men's Surge 2 Running Shoe, Black (001)/White, 12
BESTSELLER NO. 9 in 2021
  • NEUTRAL: For runners who need flexibility, cushioning & versatility
  • Lightweight, breathable mesh upper
  • External heel counter for additional support & structure
  • Enhanced cushioning around ankle collar for superior comfort
  • Full-length EVA sock liner for added comfort & a custom fit

Brooks Mens Glycerin 17 Running Shoe - Grey/Navy/Gold - D - 9.5

Brooks Mens Glycerin 17 Running Shoe - Grey/Navy/Gold - D - 9.5
BESTSELLER NO. 10 in 2021
  • SHOE SIZE: "D" = Medium width, "EE" = Wide width
  • THIS SHOE IS FOR: Neutral runners obsessed with softness and cushioning. Sleeker than in the past, this shoe will appeal to people who love tons of cushion but — until now — haven’t loved the style.
  • SUPER-SOFT CUSHIONING: The DNA LOFT cushioning provides a soft, luxurious feeling underfoot without losing responsiveness or durability, while the OrthoLite sockliner provides premium step-in comfort.
  • THE PERFECT FIT AND FEEL: The plush feel of an internal stretch bootie surrounds your foot and moves and expands with your stride. The engineered mesh upper and 3D Fit Print technology only enhance the fit.
  • SMOOTH TRANSITIONS: The DNA LOFT transition zone makes every move from heel to toe feel incredibly soft and smooth.

What to Expect when a Loved One Has ACL Surgery

My husband recently had his ACL repaired after dealing with an old injury that happened while playing football in high school. This surgery will enable him to live a pain free and active lifestyle.

Finally, after more than 15 years, he took the plunge. As we all know, everyone's personal experiences will vary so I'll describe his situation as it happened.

The first step was to see an orthopedic doctor. This "bone doc", as my husband likes to put it, did his consult and performed several x-rays to determine what the root cause of the pain was. Given the results of these tests and my husband's history of sports and injuries, the diagnosis was made fairly quickly. His ACL was torn years ago, and was not to the point of basically being completely gone, and it needed repaired.

He was given two options. The first was to undergo surgery, have the joint cleaned out and the ligament repaired. The second was to do nothing. Apparently it is not uncommon for people to choose this option if they don't care to compensate for the bum knee or to be able to participate in sports. My husband enjoys playing sports and wanted to be able to enjoy years of pain-free joints, so he decided to go with the first option.

Once surgery was decided upon, there were two other options to choose from to decide how the ligament would be replaced. The first option was a patellar tendon graft. With this technique, a portion of the patellar tendon would be removed from the good knee, along with small pieces of bone to which it attaches, and used to replace the ACL in the bad knee. Concerns with this technique include the obvious; having some form of surgery on both legs, and also later on down the road, patients often complain of some pain in the donor knee.

The second option was an allograft. This is the technique that completely replaces the torn ligament, or in my husband's case, the missing ligament, with that of a donor's. The concern with this type of procedure was personal feelings about using a donor's tissue. We were told that the chances of disease transmission, body rejection or other problems associated with this type of procedure are very rare. My husband decided to go with this second option.

After some more diagnostic testing and pre-anesthetic blood work, the surgery was planned. On the day of surgery, he was instructed to not eat or drink anything for twelve hours prior to the scheduled time and to bring along a friend or family member to wait and provide transportation home.

We were scheduled to be there at around 11 A.M. and the surgery was to begin at Noon. We arrived a little ahead of scheduled and were check in right away. My husband's vitals were taken and his knee was prepped for surgery. As his wife, I was allowed to stay with him during this period. His leg was shaved and marked for surgery, an intravenous catheter was placed and fluids were started. They were able to start surgery a few minutes early. At this time, I was no longer allowed to stay with him. He was taken back to surgery for the procedure to begin while I was escorted back up to the reception area to wait. And wait I did; six hours of it.

During these six hours, I was given updates on my husband's progress. One of the nurses would come up to let me know that he was doing well under the anesthetic and would tell me at what point they were at in the surgery. When finished, the surgeon himself came up to speak with me. He told me about how the surgery went, some things to watch for afterwards and certain things that I shouldn't allow my husband to do.

When my husband was awake, I was taken back to be with him and to be taught what to do for his aftercare. A pain pump was installed that had the potential for requiring at home care, but in his case, it ran fine the whole time it was in place so we didn't have to do anything with it. It was a small whoopee cushion looking pouch that continuously administered a set dose of local anesthetic into the joint for the first two days. This little handy dandy device kept the initial post op pain down to almost nothing. The pain pump is only in place for two days so I was given the option of being taught how to remove it at home, or to simply bring my husband back for removal. I went with the latter.

He was also given a CryoCuff. This nifty tool provided a constant flow of ice water in a wrap-form to keep the pain and swelling in his leg down. The cuff wrapped around his joint and had a nozzle that hooks up to a hose attached to a cooler. It can be drained and refilled as needed with new ice water and it stays in place in the even that he needed to get up and move around.

Sheets explaining exercises were given. Rules telling him "no driving for six weeks" and "keep the foot elevated" were printed out. The prescription for pain medication was given and discussed at this time as well. They even gave us a little card that we could fill out and send in thanking the family of the person from whom he received his new ligament.

As I stated before, and as we see on all the medical commercials on television, these results may not be typical, but after my husband was awake, I pulled the car around to the nearest exit, got his crutches ready and helped him out of the hospital. He barely needed the crutches and was putting weight on the leg before we even got into the car.

The following few days of after care were the hardest. The first day, the day of surgery, wasn't so bad. I took him home and made him rest while I ran out and got his pain medication from the pharmacy. The second day, was the worse. The pain wasn't being controlled by the pain pump and the oral pain medication did nothing. It was difficult for him to sleep and he couldn't get comfortable even when he was awake.

That third day was the day to have the pain pump removed. At the time of that appointment, we wanted to address the issue of the uncontrolled pain, but we weren't given any other options. The reason was most likely that this is just one of those things that can't be completely controlled with pain medication. He'd only had surgery a couple of days before.

That second day was the worse and during the following days, he improved. I continued to refill his CryoCuff, made him keep his foot elevated, and kept on him to keep up with his exercises. There were a few days when he just felt sick. His knee wasn't painful but he felt nauseous and dizzy all the time. As his had no joint pain, he decided he would try discontinuing his pain medication (the doctor told him he could take it as needed for pain). Once it was out of his system, he began to feel much better and no longer had these nauseous or dizzy spells.

On the tenth day, he was due to have the sutures removed, and the bandage taken off. It was amazing to see the improvement from the time of surgery to just a week and a half later. He'd stopped using his crutches after the third day and had been using the leg as much as possible. He was able to walk with just a slight limp by this time.

At this appointment, his physical therapy was started. Physical therapy is required three times per week, with descriptions of daily exercises given to do at home. Since we happen to have a stationary bike at home, he was told to start using this at just a few days after surgery. He's gone from being able to pedal only a couple of times before the knee became too painful, to being able to ride for six minutes or more at a normal steady pace without any pain.

The physical therapy was prescribed for a total of four weeks, with a note that sometimes it requires six weeks.

Overall, the experience is worth it to know that when he's completely healed, he'll be able to live a normal life without being sedentary. The surgery went well and is fairly routine. The aftercare was the worse part, but mostly that reflects on the second day. Once the initial stage of it was over, the healing process has been relatively quick.

Currently, we are in his fourth week since he had his surgery and I'm thrilled at the outcome. He is now able to walk better than he did even before the procedure was done. Prior to the surgery, he'd simply learned to live with the bum knee and to compensate for it as needed. Now, he'll be able to be pain free and live an active lifestyle as he pleases and that, to me, is priceless.

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