10 Best Running Training Program

Updated on: October 2021

Best Running Training Program in 2021


Computerized Running Training Programs

Computerized Running Training Programs
BESTSELLER NO. 1 in 2021

Running Your First Marathon: The Complete 20-Week Marathon Training Plan

Running Your First Marathon: The Complete 20-Week Marathon Training Plan
BESTSELLER NO. 2 in 2021

Marathon, Revised and Updated 5th Edition: The Ultimate Training Guide: Advice, Plans, and Programs for Half and Full Marathons

Marathon, Revised and Updated 5th Edition: The Ultimate Training Guide: Advice, Plans, and Programs for Half and Full Marathons
BESTSELLER NO. 3 in 2021

Kinetic Bands | Speed Leg Resistance Bands with Speed and Agility Digital Training Program, Workout guides, Athletic Stretching Strap | Choose From 3 Levels (Level 1 – Youth Athletes, Ages 12 & Under)

Kinetic Bands | Speed Leg Resistance Bands with Speed and Agility Digital Training Program, Workout guides, Athletic Stretching Strap | Choose From 3 Levels (Level 1 – Youth Athletes, Ages 12 & Under)
BESTSELLER NO. 4 in 2021

Build Your Running Body: A Total-Body Fitness Plan for All Distance Runners, from Milers to Ultramarathoners―Run Farther, Faster, and Injury-Free

Build Your Running Body: A Total-Body Fitness Plan for All Distance Runners, from Milers to Ultramarathoners―Run Farther, Faster, and Injury-Free
BESTSELLER NO. 5 in 2021
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Runner's World Run Less, Run Faster: Become a Faster, Stronger Runner with the Revolutionary 3-Run-a-Week Training Program

Runner's World Run Less, Run Faster: Become a Faster, Stronger Runner with the Revolutionary 3-Run-a-Week Training Program
BESTSELLER NO. 6 in 2021

Galloway Training Programs

Galloway Training Programs
BESTSELLER NO. 7 in 2021

Training Essentials for Ultrarunning: How to Train Smarter, Race Faster, and Maximize Your Ultramarathon Performance

Training Essentials for Ultrarunning: How to Train Smarter, Race Faster, and Maximize Your Ultramarathon Performance
BESTSELLER NO. 8 in 2021
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80/20 Running: Run Stronger and Race Faster By Training Slower

80/20 Running: Run Stronger and Race Faster By Training Slower
BESTSELLER NO. 9 in 2021

Triple Threat Running: Runners Workout Program with 5+1 Exercise Videos on DVD; 5K, 10K, Half Marathon & Full Marathon Training Calendars, Training Guide & Nutrition Guide

Triple Threat Running: Runners Workout Program with 5+1 Exercise Videos on DVD; 5K, 10K, Half Marathon & Full Marathon Training Calendars, Training Guide & Nutrition Guide
BESTSELLER NO. 10 in 2021
  • Triple Threat Running is 5 workouts on 5 DVDs plus bonus Form & Agility DVD designed to help you become a strong, efficient runner
  • Get great results burning fat and building muscle mass while following the calendars included to train for your upcoming race
  • Whether you are beginner or advanced runner, training for a 5K, 10K, Half Marathon or Full Marathon, this program will get you to the start line prepared to run strong and carry you through to the finish line stronger than ever
  • Includes a complete Training Guide, a Nutrition Guide and Planning Calendars for Beginner and Advanced 5K, 10K, Half Marathon and Marathon. The calendars layout when to do the strength workouts as well as what you should run and when to reach your desired distance goals
  • Form & Agility DVD – Work on drills, proper running warm up and form to help reduce chance injury while helping increase running efficiencies

Runner for Seniors

Seniors should exercise caution in planning running plans. Listening to one's body and allowing the body to recover are key.

Should older adults consider running as a form of exercise? Definitely. However, running can cause injury in anyone, especially seniors, if they don't listen to their bodies and train accordingly.

Runners usually peak in their 20s or 30s, although they are plenty of competitive elite distance runners in their 40's. As we age, we tend to see decreases in endurance and strength, as well as balance. However, these changes are affected by variables other than age. Our lifestyle (diet and exercise habits) and our genetics also play a role in how steep this decline may be.

Ignoring changes in physical abilities can put a runner at risk of injury. Senior runners, who may have decreased recovery capacities, should consider increasing their rest days. A 30-year-old runner may run 10 miles and be able to run 3-4 miles the next day without risk of injury. A 60-year-old runner may still be able to handle that 10 mile run, but may need one or two days off (or of walking or swimming) after it. It may take a 60-year-old's body longer to fully recover from a long or hard run. That doesn't mean that a long or hard run isn't possible for a senior runner. Older runners just need to be smart about their training.

Older runners may also struggle with balance more than younger runners. This is something that senior runners are typically not aware of---yet, a young runner hits a patch of ice and can stumble but stay on their feet. An older runner may end up on the ground, risking injury. How can senior runners cope with decreased balance? Activities such as yoga may help people to maintain balance, and older adult runners may want to cancel an outdoor run when conditions are questionable. Older runners should also be cautious if they prefer trail running.

Cross-training can be especially useful for senior runners. Beneficial activities to do on non-running days are Pilates, yoga, swimming, walking, or low-impact cardio machines, such as Ellipticals. Many older adult runners are disappointed that their bodies can only handle 2-3 runs a week. Instead of taking the remaining days off, think of them as days to strengthen your body in new ways. After all, the body responds well to new and challenging movements. Variety is a great addition to any training plan.

Older runners should also be cautious in increasing the time, length, and intensity of their runs. When I was in my mid-20s, I could take the whole winter off from running. Then, on the first nice day of spring, I could head out for a 6 mile run. As we age, this becomes more difficult. Although it may be tempting for older runners to be in a rush to ramp up their training, the risk of injury is great. And what good is a 6 mile run if the consequence is that you can't run again for several weeks?

When increasing mileage or time, senior runners should consider walking. If you can easily run 4 miles and want to push further, consider adding a few more minutes of running along with some brisk walking. Over time, turn that walking into running. Older runners may find that this is a smart strategy to use to progress while remaining injury-free.

Runners are typically horrible about listening to their bodies. Does that knee hurt? Another mile will be fine. However, this lack of attention to seemingly minor aches and pains is particularly damaging for senior runners. Sensations that are merely annoying may turn into major injuries. So, if you feel a little twinge in your hip, stop and walk. Stretch out your hip flexors. If it doesn't go away, forgo your run. Go home and ice it. (Remember RICE? Rest, ice, compression, and elevation?)

In sum, with a few precautions, many people can continue running as they age. Older runners, however, should focus on smart training. After all, a little intelligence will go a long way in keeping you active and injury-free.

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